The Future of Work: Telecommuting and Huddle Rooms

It seems like every day we are hearing about a new technology that can be added to the board room or conference room. There are new displays such as 4k TV's, all sorts of content sharing dongles and adapters, touch screen interfaces like the Microsoft Hub and from video conferencing solutions from Polycom like the Eagle Eye Producer that allows your system to "frame the shot" for you as participants enter the room. But what does this mean in a world where less workers have access to traditional conference rooms?

Credit: New York Times

What sometimes gets lost in the shuffle is that the nature of work is changing. Not everyone is working out of a physical office or at least not 100% of the time. Telecommuting is on the rise (by almost 80% over the past 10 years). And even when workers are in the office, they aren't working out of the 1980s-style cubicles they once were. Open-office floor plans are now becoming the norm with the idea being that it will increase collaboration and communication. However, workers still need places to meet privately (and cut down on their anxiety from an open-office) which has given a rise to smaller, simpler meeting spaces aka "huddle rooms." 

Credit: UX Matters

The days of thinking just about "what kind of tech can we fit in this conference room?" are no more. You now must consider how to organize remote workers calling into meetings from laptops and mobile devices and huddle rooms that need a scalable, size-appropriate tech solutions such as Ubiety for virtual meeting rooms and the Polycom Convene for small huddle rooms. And then figure out a way to tie all of these together that is easy and doesn't require a huge IT investment. As the nature of work changes, the need for efficient means for communication will only increase. It just might look different. 

Posted by Jordan Myers at 11:21 AM

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